Believe On Purpose
November 4, 2014
James 4
November 5, 2014
Believe On Purpose
November 4, 2014
James 4
November 5, 2014

1 Corinthians 10:16 – Communion

1 cor 10-16 700x400

1 Corinthians 10:16
16 The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ?

This is a very concise definition of communion. In fact, I suspect that from this verse we learned to call it communion. It has become a ritual in most churches who partake once a month. But it’s much more than going through the traditional monthly ceremony.

Jesus began the idea of partaking in a special way. “19 And He took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and gave to them, saying, This is My body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of Me. 20 Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in My blood, which is shed for you” (Luke 22:19-20). Even before Jesus died on the Cross, He set this in motion as a “remembrance of me.” He made no other stipulations concerning the partaking of communion–just remember what the Cross is about.

The word “communion” is the Greek word koinōnia which is often translated fellowship and means “having in common.” Other words could be partnership, communication, distribution, share, participation, and contribution. The NASB uses the word sharing. “Is not the cup of blessing which we bless a sharing in the blood of Christ? Is not the bread which we break a sharing in the body of Christ?

The whole point in taking communion is to remember what Jesus did on the Cross—His finished work. It has nothing to do whether the person taking it is worthy or in right standing, or has all his sins confessed. It’s only about Jesus and what His shed blood and broken body means to us today.

I like the term “cup of blessing.” That sums up what the communion is about. Jesus has blessed us through His death on the Cross. He removed our sins giving us total forgiveness and freedom from guilt and condemnation. His death provided for our salvation which means healing, deliverance, provision, and so much more.

Always approach communion as a time of blessing and do so in remembrance of all the things Jesus did for us on the Cross.