God’s Unchanging Love For You
July 10, 2024
July 12th
July 12, 2024
God’s Unchanging Love For You
July 10, 2024
July 12th
July 12, 2024

Blame Game Pt 2

We’re looking at the blame game. Last week we discussed the murder of the Galileans in Luke 13:1-3. Today this look at Luke 13:3-4.

4 Or do you think that those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them were worse offenders than all the other people who live in Jerusalem? 5 No, I tell you, but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” (Luke 13:3-4 NASB)

Luke 13:1-3 talks about people being murdered or killed at the hands of others. Luke 13:3-4 talks about people losing their life by accidents.

This tower was probably one of the towers of the city wall, near the pool of Siloam. Of its fall nothing is known. Jesus knew about it, however, and the disaster it caused. Its fall crushed 18 people. Jesus brought it up to answer those thinking they must have died because they were bad people or deserved it somehow by their lifestyle. Do you suppose these eighteen were bad sinners as well, deserving of God’s judgment? No, they died in an accident. Their goodness or badness did not come into it. Death comes to all, sometimes unexpectedly.

“A pastor’s family was killed during a vehicle crash in Howard County on Saturday.” “Four family members of an Atlanta church have been killed in a car crash, leaving their five-year-old son as the sole survivor.” We hear of these tragic headlines everyday. 227,039 people were killed in accidents in 2022. 43,000 are killed in car accidents each year. These accidents touch everyone’s life. We all know of people, friends, and family who have died in an accident.

Of course, our first finger pointing is at God. But to the question, ” do you think that those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them were worse offenders than all the other people who live in Jerusalem?” the answer was an unequivocal “NO.” The people who died did not die because God wanted them dead. There were not bad people. They weren’t any worse than anyone else.

Many people have tried to explain why bad things (accidents) happen to good people, or any people for that matter. Here’s a quote From one of the books trying to explain why bad things happen to good people. (Do a search and you’ll see lots of them.) This is from a Rabbi whose three-year-old son was diagnosed with a degenerative disease that meant the boy would only live until his early teens.

“God does not cause our misfortunes. Some are caused by bad luck, some are caused by bad people, and some are simply an inevitable consequence of our being human and being mortal, living in a world of inflexible natural laws. The painful things that happen to us are not punishments for our misbehavior, nor are they in any way part of some grand design on God’s part. Because the tragedy is not God’s will, we need not feel hurt or betrayed by God when tragedy strikes. We can turn to Him for help in overcoming it, precisely because we can tell ourselves that God is as outraged by it as we are.” Harold S. Kushner, When Bad Things Happen to Good People.

Let’s continue this discussion next week.